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This New Video is Harsh and Awesome

It will hit your soul

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So No. You can’t beat us lightly. You can’t beat us hard. You can beat us fair and square the same way we can beat you: on the field and in the boardroom.

UN Women Pakistan just released a video that is sending some serious chills down our spine – in the best way possible. The #Beatme Women video which was released day before yesterday on the UN’s social media platforms, features some of the biggest female influencers in the country today, asking society to “beat” them, at what they do best. “Beat me” is the new response to the Council of Islamic Ideologies absurd advise to the Pakistani government: that husbands should be allowed to ‘lightly beat’ their wives.

The video has already been shared thousands of times. Why? Because it addresses a very pertinent issue that weirdly hasn’t gotten enough airtime as it deserves. Violence against women is close to every woman’s heart simply because it hits home. Literally and figuratively. Domestic violence against women spans across social and economic classes, age groups and geographical boundaries. If you’re not a victim then somebody close to you is. Which is why the fact that there isn’t that much dialogue about this issue is strange.

But now there is this. UN Women Pakistan has managed to get some of the best creatives on the job despite having low budgets. The concept of this impactful video was conceived by BBDO Pakistan, and directed by Jami and his team completely pro bono.

As explained by film Moor’s director Jami, the video was made “crude, harsh, and to the point,” says Jami, “so that it’s not just hard-hitting, but heart-hitting.” He wants to make people realise that despite what they believe, violence against women is not a debate, its simply “Not OK”.  “We start with depicting women the way these men want to see them: scared and timid,” he explains, “and then the turning point comes in when their attitude changes.”

We love the concept and the commentary and would love to see an Urdu version too so that the message is delivered on a larger scale!